week 3 in math 10

(-3m2n3)2 (-2m3n) 3(1/72m2n3)

Use PP -3m2n3 must be multiplied 2 times and -2m3n must be multiplied 3 times, but 1/72m2n3 does need to (Because there is no exponent, and that is same as that there is 1).

(9m4n6) (-8m9n3)(1/72m2n3)

It can be multiplied with same bases.

-72m13n9/72m2n3

And it can be divided

-m13-2n9-3= -m11n6

We can get the results that a is -1, b is 11, and c is 6, so -1+11+6 is equal to 16

week 2 in math 10

We learned about what is prime factorization.

It consists of prime factors. We can use them when we should find the prime factors. First of all, it should be divided by the smallest prime number, the number (72 is an example for this explanation) should keep dividing by the smallest prime numbers. Lastly, gather all of the prime numbers if it becomes the prime number, and make a prime factorization.

Innovation Project – Final Post

2) Core Competency

I focus on traffic accidents. So I searched about the most common traffic accidents through internet and some people around me, and researched how I can solve those problems with electricity.

3) Collaboration Reflection

In my group, I think it was nice, because he thought an idea about traffic accidents for this project, and he told me he researched about that. But he was too sick to come school for a few weeks and I didn’t know the reason but he didn’t deliver them to me, so I had to do this presentation almost on my own. But, he didn’t think about this topic, it was impossible to get good works.

4) Experience Debrief

It wasn’t perfect but I liked to give a presentation on my own.

I could learn about to find the problems in our lives, and how we can research about that. how I can share the information and prepare presentation with people.

DNA model

  1. How are chromosomes, DNA, and genes related to one another (you will need to research this).
    Gene are segment of DNA and chromosomes consist of DNA.
  2. Explain what these pieces represent:
  3. a) Licorice is the DNA ladders
  4. b) Marshmallows (each colour) are the steps. Pink is adenine, yellow is thymine, orange is cytosine, and green is guanine
  5. How did this activity help you understand the structure of DNA.

This activity shows me the absolutely example

Observing cells

1. Using your sketches and the photos you took of your plant and animal cells, explain:

                a. What do animal cells look like under the microscope? What cell structures are visible?

Animal cells look like it rounded shapes like eggs and I was able to see the nucleus in the cells.

               

                b. What do plant cells look like under the microscope? What cell structures are visible?

Plant cells look like rectangular shapes that are so close each other.

 

2. How can you tell plant cells and animal cells apart (if you only see them under the microscope)?

Animal cells are irregular shapes but plant cells are regular and constant.

3. We used methylene blue on the animal cell. Why was it important to treat animal cells with this compound?
Why didn’t we use it on the plant cells?

We can observe animal cells clearly, because animal cells don’t have a colouring matter, so we can’t compare them well. Plant cells have Chloroplast, so we can compare well without colouring matters.

4. Reflection:


What did you learn while doing this lab?

I learned the difference of animal cell and plant cell and the structure of those cells.


What questions arose while doing this lab? What are you curious about?

Why do they need to be in different shapes?