12 Daily Breakdown Semester II

June 14th, 2019

Theme / analysis Paragraph tips and tricks (adapted from Provincial)

Look over the paragraph response question BEFORE you start reading the text.

Respond to the text and not your own ideas about the topic

In your AG (attention getter), focus on the theme of the text, then follow up with the significance (why, as a reader, we should care about this text)

Now ANSWER the question in a thesis statement followed up with support from the beginning, middle, and end of the text (2 or more quotes).

Move beyond WHAT is happening to HOW (choices) and WHY (context)

Use powerful revelatory VERBS

Use literary vocabulary such as protagonist, irony, foreshadowing, symbol, etc

Write descriptively with elevated vocabulary

Have a conclusion that has an epiphany that is insightful.

Create a title for your paragraph that uses elements from your conclusion.

June 11th, 2019

Some of you have been wondering the plan for these last 2 weeks:

  1. Last week: Overview of the stand-alone paragraph (peer review) + pre-assessment
  2. This week: Review of Stand-alone and rubric standard / peer review of synthesis (Thursday) + 2nd provincial online – Friday lecture and application of stand-alone
  3. Next Week: Narrative focus: Fine tune narrative essays and Thursday read aloud of narrative papers in circle – out loud = commitment to your words / Monday-Wednesday Final Provincial examination for final assessment

June 10th, 2019

Meeting in computer lab.

We will work on ‘extra’ practice today (Provincial F) because of many sick individuals who might need to recover from an epidemic.

June 5th, 2019

https://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/exams/search/

June 4th, 2019

Provincial Boot-camp day #1

Here are the preliminary papers I want to go over with you:

12_literary_terms

12_table_description

18_scoring_guides

Exam Prompts and Themes_Setters

key_words

Themes On Past Exams

I would like for you to look at a specific prompt. Remember that we did this a little while ago? I would like to revisit this and then have you come up with a theme statement based on the prompt given.

June 3rd, 2019

The rest of the inquiry projects will go today.

Please respond to the questions in class.

We will also have a final vocabulary practice. I will print it out for you.

May 30th, 2019

Here are the sheets that you might have missed:

Inquiry Guided 2 of 5

Inquiry Guided 3 of 5

Inquiry Guided 4 of 5

May 29th, 2019

Chapter 16 today – what the creature wants.

You have the 1st 30 minutes to work more on your presentations.

May 28th, 2019

So Victor has had a lot of bad things happen to him. Now it’s time for the Monster’s side of the story.

First, you have 30-40 minutes to get everything in order and then we’ll read.

May 27th, 2019

First 30 minutes is getting everything together. You will have this until Friday where you should be ready to present.

Here is the inquiry file:

Final Inquiry Project V2

Let’s go over this first.

After that, we will go through day 4 of the Frankenstein book.

May 24th, 2019

AP Quiz

  1. We will go over the questions for day 2
  2. We will go over the beginning of the second part.
  3. I also have section 3 of the inquiry project (That we’ll do 1st after the quiz.)

May 23rd, 2019

  1. We will go over the questions for day 1
  2. We will then read from the beginning of chapter 1
  3. I also have section 2 of the inquiry project.

Lots to do! AP test tomorrow.

May 22nd, 2019

We will complete ‘day 1’ of the schedule I gave you yesterday. Please see the link below.

I also have the sheet to help you find outside work that will link to your theme. We’re doing 2 things at once now. It’s crucial you will be on point. I will help you every step of the way.

Inquiry Guided 2 of 5

May 21st, 2019

  1. what inquiry projects you have completed before.
  2. What does it mean to search for knowledge? How is it different from completing a task?
  3. How can you ask the right questions in order to get answers that invoke wonder and desire for more? In other words: How do I know I’m asking the right questions?

AP Test # 5

(Printout)

Frankenstein Overview:

Here is the text – we are short on books as the other 12 class is doing the same book.

frankenstein

Here is the overview of the unit:

Reading Guide 7 day plan

And I will guide you through how this will actually play out. It is an ‘inquiry project’ first and foremost.

May 14th-16th, 2019

Spoken Word. Alphabetically ordered. Ackerman through… Walker perhaps.

May 13th, 2019

This is the week of spoken word. We will do a few exercises, but here are the major pieces that you should have with you. We’ll go over the rules again and then come up with a final sign up plan so that you can focus yourself to the due date.

Rubric for Spoken Word

Spoken Word Presentation

Narrative Fragmentation

  1. find an ‘artifact’ in your bag.
  2. Put it in the center table.
  3. We’ll do a quick Kinesthetic warm up so you can get rid of your egos
  4. Focus on an object.
  5. Quietly go back to your desks, don’t talk to anyone else about anything
  6. Write for five minutes about the artifact
  7. Come back into the circle
  8. One word that comes to mind from your story ‘word ball’
  9. Go back to your story and circle key words
  10. Export these chosen words to another piece of paper and reorder them as a poem
  11. Make a physical emblem from these poems

May 9th, 2019

Showtime!

May 8th, 2019

Showtime!

May 7th, 2019

Like we talked about yesterday, this is all about getting those scripts ready for tomorrow. Good luck with everything. Let me know if you need more ideas.

May 6th, 2019

So today I cut out the AP quiz. I would like to do that next week. This week will be fast and very good if you have all the right tools.

Let me see if you have done the scene well. You don’t have to memorize it, but you do have to know it well enough so that you’re not reading all the time.

This is a work block to finish these scenes.

Here’s the final rubric – simple:

One act Rubric

May 3rd, 2019

Look up awkward situations and the ideas will come for your scene. I know that buzzfeed is not the best source for information, but for stupid situations, it’s gold. Put one of these in your scenes and hilarity will ensue.

https://www.scoopwhoop.com/humor/weird-situations/#.efhg816cq

Also, scenes will be acted out today.

May 2nd, 2019

Please continue your hard work. We have a group today that will be going at the end of class. I will give you up to 10:05 to complete this work.

For the rest of you, after the vocabulary test is your time, then you’ll have some script writing time. Rough draft will be due on Monday.

May 1st, 2019

Today is a day in which you can memorize your scenes throughout the school. I have a few sites to show you first. These will get you ready for the scene.

Let me know about if you need any help.

Here is the rubric:

One act Rubric

April 30th, 2019

Test today. Do your best. Come up with good answers  that show extended learning – not just what I said.

After you’re finished, quietly pick a scene (2 pages) you are going to memorize. We will have a showtime on Friday. During that time, you should think about ideas for your scene as well.

April 29th, 2019

Vocab  Printout. 20 minutes to work on this.

Final written test based on 4 questions from the text. Each question is worth 5. There are no secrets. We’ve discussed it all in class.

Good Luck!

Also… In your group, pick a scene that you will memorize in the next 2 -3 days. Should be no more than 2 pages. These pages will be an inspiration for your own plays. More to come soon.

Here are some excellent ‘Farce’ scenes you can get your ideas from:

http://www.lazybeescripts.co.uk/Scripts/Results.aspx?iSk=1&i17=1&iFa=1

And a fun way to generate a short story to base your scene on:

https://www.plot-generator.org.uk/story/

April 25th, 2019

AP test #6

Finish questions for act 2

Finish act 3

Start questions for act 3:

  1. Lady Bracknell has been described as “the perfect embodiment of the
    attitudes and rules of conduct of the British aristocracy.” How does Wilde
    unmask the mercenary motives of Lady Bracknell to reveal her essential
    snobbishness and hypocrisy in the final act?
  2. To a certain extent, Miss Prism and Dr. Chasuble are also satirical figures
    through whom Wilde attacks British institutions, namely education and the
    Church of England. Explain briefly what aspects of these institutions Wilde is
    satirizing.
  3. Define the term “bunburying,” and explain its significance in the play. How
    does bunburying relate to Wilde’s critique of Victorian earnestness? How are
    even Cecily and Dr. Chasuble “bunburyists”?
  4. The play has a number of objects that acquire additional meanings as the
    action develops. Explain how three of the following symbols in The Importance of Being Earnest relate to the plot and especially to the characters: cucumber sandwiches, bread-and-butter, the German language, French music and language, bottles of champagne, teacake, muffins, and the capacious handbag.
  5. “Although we see little of them, each of the butlers has a back story and
    serves as a vehicle for Wilde’s satire of the aristocracy.” Explain.
  6. If the principal characters will go to any lengths to avoid their
    responsibilities and place self- interest at the top of their own agendas, then a resolution of the conflicts in the play would be impossible: somebody has to make concessions. How does the resolution scene in the third act resolve the conflicts between Lady Bracknell and Jack? Jack and Algernon? Gwendolen and Cecily?

April 24th, 2019

Finish off questions for act 2

Read all of act 3. It’s pretty short.

Get ready for the final questions tomorrow and a review of the whole book. Final on Monday – 5 select questions from the 30 questions you have been assigned.

April 23rd, 2019

AP test #6 (Printout of first 2 pages)

Today, you will finish the questions for act 2.

We will discuss these 20 minutes before the end of class.

April 18th, 2019

Vocbulary.

Let’s go over the questions first. Depending on your attention level, this should take no more than 15 minutes. Please go into depth with what you said, not what you copied and pasted.

Act 2 actors:

Miss Prism: Edgecombe

Cecily: Paige

Chasuble: Max

Merriman: Ryan

Algernon: Hannah

Jack: Alex

Gwendolen: Keisha

  1. “Gwendolen and Cecily are not so much opposites as complements.” Explain this remark by reference to their speeches and actions.
  2. Early on in Act One Jack Worthing articulates the difference between city lifeand country life. Show three ways in which the life of the country (as
    exemplified by the Manor House, Woolton, Herfordshire) is very different from the bachelor life of The Albany, London.
  3. Like Jack, Algy leads a double life, utilizing an escape mechanism when
    necessary to free himself of a life of social obligation and lead a life of
    unrestrained pleasure. Explain their differing motivations, but how both are
    “confirmed Bunburyists,” nevertheless.
  4. The comedy of mistaken identity is a very old dramatic form – as old, in fact, as comedy itself – which Wilde manages to revitalize in The Importance of Being Earnest. The key mistaken identity in this play, of course, is that of “Ernest” himself. What comic consequences result from Algernon’s assuming the role of Ernest Worthing?
  5. In what ways would the terms “hedonist,” “aesthete,” and “gourmand” be
    suitable descriptors for Algernon?
  6. How would you characterize Canon Chasuble and his relationship with Miss Prism? Why does Wilde include them at this point in the play?
  7. Give five examples of Wilde’s wit, comedy and/or satire in this act. How
    does this further his satirical purpose?
  8. A subtle sub-theme of the play is readers, publishers, fiction, and
    censorship. What points by implication is Wilde making about contemporary
    literature?
  9. What role does food have within the play? (Notice how Jack and Algy are
    eating muffins at key points – and then those pesky cucumber sandwiches in
    Act I…)
  10. Based on the types of comedy discussed, how would you define The
    Importance of Being Earnest thus far? Defend your selections using textual
    references.

October 30th, 2018

“All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does, and that is his.”

― Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

Questions before we start:

What is a parody, satire or farce?

What is comedy?

Actors today:

Jack (Earnest) : Kevin

Algernon :

Lane : Julien

Gwendolen :

Lady Bracknell : Haein

Cat: Shannon

We will be starting the play. If we finish act 1 today, then these questions will be due by tomorrow for discussion. I’ll collect your answers after.

  1. Why does Jack Worthing call himself “Ernest” instead when he is in “town”
    (London)?
  2. Why has Algernon invented an invalid friend named “Bunbury”?
  3. Jack has an insurmountable impediment to marrying Gwendolen in his
    background: what, as Lady Bracknell sees it, is this problem? How does she
    propose that he resolve this problem? What is Wilde satirizing in this
    situation?
  4. How does Wilde use the subject of cucumber sandwiches to reveal the
    characters of Jack and Algy?
  5. How does Wilde satirize the vacuous mentalities and lifestyles of the British
    aristocracy in Lady Bracknell’s interview with Jack?
  6. How does Wilde use the cigarette case to facilitate the exposition of the
    dramatic action?
  7. The character of Algernon Moncrieff reflects the public persona of the
    dramatist himself: in what ways in Algy like Wilde? Refer to background
    information.
  8. Why is the classical allusion in which Wilde compares Lady Bracknell to the
    Gorgon particularly apt? Look up this allusion if you don’t know.
  9. What point is Wilde making about journalism in general and reviewers in
    particular when Algernon remarks, “You should leave that [literary criticism] to
    people who haven’t been at University. They do it so well in the daily papers”?
  10. What tools of satire –irony, juxtaposition, understatement, paradox –are
    apparent in this opening act?

April 16th, 2019

“It is awfully hard work doing nothing. However, I don’t mind hard work where there is no definite object of any kind.”

-Algernon, Act 1, Importance of Being Earnest

Finish act one.

Complete the questions by the end of class.

April 12th, 2019 / April 15th, 2019

“Men always want to be a woman’s first love. Women have a more subtle instinct: What they like is to be a man’s last romance.”

― Oscar Wilde

 

Actors today:

Jack (Earnest) : Alex

Algernon : Kirsten

Lane : Jayden

Gwendolen : Keisha

Lady Bracknell : Haein

We will be starting the play. If we finish act 1 today, then these questions will be due by tomorrow for discussion. I’ll collect your answers after.

  1. Why does Jack Worthing call himself “Ernest” instead when he is in “town”
    (London)?
  2. Why has Algernon invented an invalid friend named “Bunbury”?
  3. Jack has an insurmountable impediment to marrying Gwendolen in his
    background: what, as Lady Bracknell sees it, is this problem? How does she
    propose that he resolve this problem? What is Wilde satirizing in this
    situation?
  4. How does Wilde use the subject of cucumber sandwiches to reveal the
    characters of Jack and Algy?
  5. How does Wilde satirize the vacuous mentalities and lifestyles of the British
    aristocracy in Lady Bracknell’s interview with Jack?
  6. How does Wilde use the cigarette case to facilitate the exposition of the
    dramatic action?
  7. The character of Algernon Moncrieff reflects the public persona of the
    dramatist himself: in what ways in Algy like Wilde? Refer to background
    information.
  8. Why is the classical allusion in which Wilde compares Lady Bracknell to the
    Gorgon particularly apt? Look up this allusion if you don’t know.
  9. What point is Wilde making about journalism in general and reviewers in
    particular when Algernon remarks, “You should leave that [literary criticism] to
    people who haven’t been at University. They do it so well in the daily papers”?
  10. What tools of satire –irony, juxtaposition, understatement, paradox –are
    apparent in this opening act?

April 11th, 2019

New unit, finally –

There are only two tragedies in life: one is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.”

-Oscar Wilde

Here is the unit plan:

Importance of Being Earnest Unit Plan-1otdpxu

There are two ways we can go with this:

Start with one of the best short stories Oscar Wilde has done, or the biography of Wilde.

188_The_Happy_Prince-ql8m5l

This is the biography of one of my personal heroes: Oscar Wilde. The bet way to know a work and the time is to find out about the creator. Tomorrow, we will be starting The Importance of Being Earnest. 

Five minute write on what you got out of this video. We will share tomorrow

April 10th, 2019

This is the last day to work on your papers. Please get them done.

I’ll collect them at the end of class.

April 9th, 2019

Keep going and doing a good job in completing this assignment. I will be here to help you with whatever step you need in order to get that good grade.

I’ll do my rounds as the class progresses.

April 8th, 2019

AP #4 (Handout)

So today is a workshop day. Remember that outline from last Thursday’s class? Now it’s up to you to check and work on. The final draft for this assignment will be on Wednesday at the end of class.

April 5th, 2019

Three things to do today:

  1. Spelling test.
  2. Finish the last 30 minutes of Perks
  3. Discuss the characters in the story

Next week, get ready to finalize an outline. It will be a bit of work. I will extend the due date to Wednesday. If there are any questions, make them for this class and Monday when you do the outline.

April 4th, 2019

We will be starting The Perks of Being a Wallflower today. Keep in mind the character sheet as we will be going over that on Friday. I have a basic outline you can follow for a three paragraph structure. Luckily it’s the same as the 1 paragraph structure. You follow it, you’ll be good.

3 Paragraph Essay Structure-16k8ktw

April 3rd, 2019

After the movie finishes, we will talk about the four main characters. This discussion is important because others can get ideas from what you talk about. If you need more time, look at the working script:

STAND BY ME (1986) by Raynold Gideon & Bruce A Evans (1985-06-19) [scan]-1w3y242

After that, we will start The Perks of Being a Wallflower. I think that we can finish it tomorrow.

Friday is a day to work on the  3 paragraph comparison / contrast essay outline.

April 2nd, 2019

We will start our movie today. I am excited for this, as you can adopt film into your own analytical minds – impress your friends.

Here are the characterization maps for Stand by Me and Wallflower.

Characterization Map – The Body-21ed56v

Characterization map Wallflower-1he5x2u

These are basic character bubble sheets. Take notes on each character as it will help you while you’re watching the movie.

April 1st, 2019

Vocabulary #4 (Printout)

Rites of Passage Unit:

Overview: The Body Synthesis unit overview-2arv043

  1. What are some ‘coming of age’ stories?
  2. What are the elements of a maturity story? (Brainstorm)

-A comparison essay PPT (Take notes)

Textual Analysis – PowerPoint(1)-1jsncqq

We will be analyzing film.

These are the texts to the films we will be watching:

The Body by Stephen King Full Text-1dzzuy5

the_perks_of_being_a_wallflower-yh7f7z

Read over some of them. I will give you 15 minutes and then we can talk about it.

Tomorrow, we will be starting The Body – I will give you a handout to take notes, first thing.

March 15th, 2019

AP test #3 – look over it.

Then, peer review sheets (I’ll hand out)

The time is yours to finish that paper. Good luck. Please finish by the end of class.

March 14th, 2019

This will be very short  5 mins – I would like for you to really understand the structure which is quite important for a provincial paragraph.

Final Lenses Paper-1mf9kif

And the rubric I will use.

Rubric Theme Paragreph-1wrlj18

The peer review  sheets I will give out first thing tomorrow. Please get it checked from other sources.

March 13th, 2019

Let’s continue the Lion King. We have 65 minutes – The film has about 55, so I will check if you’re getting the major details and I will then start it for the rest of class.

Tomorrow, I will give a short lecture on how to put together a 10 sentence paragraph (a review for most of you) and when you get it, you can start to work on your own lens paragraph.

Enjoy the film.

March 12th, 2019

Lion King today!

Let’s share our fairy tales. I’ll give you 15 minutes to get everything sorted out.

I’m excited.

March 11th, 2019

AP #3 Printout

Lenses! Here is a week long review on lenses for you to enjoy before we do a synthesis movie unit when we get back from break. Three movies in Three weeks!

12 Lenses review-201ts7m

Power-point today:

2_critical_lenses_of_literature-172odea

Find a children’s story and use a lens to dissect it. (Minor letter grade)

March 8th, 2019

Vocab Test!

No quote today… I would like you to spend this full block to really polish those papers, get everything ready – confirm your genius with another human being and print it out to be turned in. I’ll read them over the weekend.

March 7th, 2019

“The most important things are the hardest things to say. They are the things you get ashamed of, because words make them smaller. When they were in your head, they were limitless; but when they come out they seem to be no bigger than normal things.”

― Stephen King, The Body

Check with three people. Have them really go to town on your work.

The rest of the time is yours to finish the narrative. You can always check with me.

If you have more than one you’d like for me to read, hand it in as well. Can’t hurt your chances!

March 6th, 2019

No quote today, like I promised.

Journals yesterday were excellent. Did you commit to your prompt? This can be a springboard for you to get into your final narrative. They don’t have to be the same thing.

  1. Participants? I’ll check each person if you’re uncomfortable.
  2. Work on your stories together / solo.
  3. Rough draft is due tomorrow for peer review.
  4. Good draft is due at the end of the class, printed, for Friday.

March 5th. 2019

It takes considerable knowledge just to realize the extent of your own ignorance.

Thomas Sowell

So we have done the work with the last reading – the Dave Sedaris diary. Now it is time to share your diary journals.

Today will also be a kind of – improvised class for your own narrative. The trick to finding a good thing to write about is to find a good voice.

And with this voice comes improvisation skills.

So many times I’ve heard “I don’t know what to write.” So here are some good ideas for you to get started.

Creative Writing Prompts-2hleeyj

By the end of class, I do believe that you’ll have something to write about and it will be due on Friday.

Peer edit first draft will be first thing Thursday.

March 4th, 2019

“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

― Carl Sagan, Cosmos

Vocabulary #3 (Printout)

10 minutes to do the vocabulary.

We will talk about the voice and tone of the author in How to Travel With a Salmon.

This is our final paper:

Narrative Finals-2o42njf

  1. How does tone drive the narrative?
  2. How can one make a strong writing out of mundane points? What does Eco do to make a playful event work?
  3. How is humor used in the text?

If we have time, we will go over the final text by David Sedaris – thus making a true definition of humor in a narrative.

Let’s finish this today and talk about the parts to make a great whole when it comes to non-fiction storytelling.

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/david-sedaris-the-ihop-years

March 1st, 2019

Journal #19

“We wear clothes, and speak, and create civilizations, and believe we are more than wolves. But inside us there is a word we cannot pronounce and that is who we are.”

― Anthony Marra, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena

So we will read our second story after talking about the questions regarding structure on your piece.

Then we’ll read the second piece by Eco called “How to travel with a salmon.”

We will talk about the voice and tone of the author.

  1. How does tone drive the narrative?
  2. How can one make a strong writing out of mundane points? What does Eco do to make a playful event work?
  3. How is humor used in the text?

If we have time, we will go over the final text by David Sedaris – thus making a true definition of humor in a narrative.

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/david-sedaris-the-ihop-years

February 28th, 2019

Journal #18

“Whoever is not in his coffin and the dark grave, let him know he has enough.”

― Walt Whitman

So, the non- fiction narratives should be done. If not, please spend some time today getting things ready and getting a peer review of the essay before you hand it in at 9:45AM.

After that, we will be working on a story today that is a true non-fiction piece.

Shields-2kdusvx

I also have a hard copy of this as well.

If we have time, I have another. Here is the link:

How to Travel with a Salmon

What make these pieces work as non fiction?

What is the voice in both pieces?

How do these pieces speak to the reader?

Tomorrow we’ll finish these two and then work on college prompt brainstorms. I’ll show you that even a sentence can trigger a full story. Even if your life is boring – which I assure you, is not.

February 27th, 2019

Journal #17

“We’re so self-important. So arrogant. Everybody’s going to save something now. Save the trees, save the bees, save the whales, save the snails. And the supreme arrogance? Save the planet! Are these people kidding? Save the planet? We don’t even know how to take care of ourselves; we haven’t learned how to care for one another. We’re gonna save the —–‘ planet? . . . And, by the way, there’s nothing wrong with the planet in the first place. The planet is fine. The people are ——! Compared with the people, the planet is doin’ great. It’s been here over four billion years . . . The planet isn’t goin’ anywhere, folks. We are! We’re goin’ away. Pack your —-, we’re goin’ away. And we won’t leave much of a trace. Thank God for that. Nothing left. Maybe a little Styrofoam. The planet will be here, and we’ll be gone. Another failed mutation; another closed-end biological mistake.”

― George Carlin

Today we work on our narratives. They are due tomorrow at the end of class, so if you’re finished, get some people to check it and then you can feel a good sense of how it will be received by me.

Narrative prompts 12s-176b647

Our next step after this is to do a little reading on good non-fiction narrative pieces.

February 26th, 2019

Man surprised me most about humanity. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.

-Dalai Lama

I’ll finish the PPT.

Next – look up some questions (generic) that colleges ask you.

We’ll share these as a group.

Choose one.

Check these out for laughs: Let’s take a look at these gems.

the_very_worst_college_application_essays-27240kk

This might be a major example, so let’s come up with “what a bad essay looks like” as a class. I will write down some good ideas that we will share.

February 25th, 2019

“To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.”

― Oscar Wilde

Vocab test.

AP exam questions printout.

AP 2-2b1cqc8

Now this is framed as a ‘college application’ unit – but the actual premise will be for you to write strong narrative non fiction. This week, I will be giving you examples, but first, I need what is called a pre-assessment.

We are going to start our ‘college application’  non-fiction unit today. Here is the outline for the unit so you know what to expect:

College Application Unit 12’s-14ttndi

Take notes on this:

Writing The College Essay – Dos and Donts-tx55h2

Choose a college and research it. I’ll come around with a checklist at the end of class and help you with it.

February 21st, 2019

Man surprised me most about humanity. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.

-Dalai Lama

Finish up and turn in those speeches today.

February 20th, 2019

Journal #13

“Some things you miss because they’re so tiny you overlook them. But some things you don’t see because they’re so huge.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Today, you can work on your speeches. They are due tomorrow.

February 19th, 2019

Journal #12

“It seemed right to do it this way, because the rite of passage is a magic corridor and so we always provide an aisle – it’s what you walk down when you get married, what they carry you down when you get buried. Our corridor was those twin rails, and we walked between them, just bopping along toward whatever this was supposed to mean.”
― Stephen King, The Body

Vocabulary 15 mins (Printout – absent? Get it from a friend.)

Obama Paper is due. I’ll collect it. Through Wednesday, you have time to work on your own rhetorical speech. Please see me for anything.

Thursday: Narrative Non-fiction crash course. This will go through the next Wednesday. It’s a provincial prep unit, framed as college / grad school apps.

February 14th, 2019

Journal #11

“We were young, and we had no need for prophecies. Just living was itself an act of prophecy.”

― Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

AP test #1

So Today is the final day for the Obama paper. If you are finished, I’d like for you to work on your own rhetorical speech. I’ll give you a guideline for this by the end of the day.

Hope you had fun yesterday!

Here’s the instructions for your own speech:

Purdy Own Rhetorical Speech-1lr23vu

February 13th, 2019

Journal #10

“We often miss opportunity because it’s dressed in overalls and looks like work”

― Thomas A. Edison

Today is a day to work on your final Obama paper. It will be due at the end of class on Thursday because of recent events. You can also spend some time to finish your own rhetorical speech. See me if you need any help.

February 11th, 2019

Journal #9

“It’s ok to be a fool once or twice but never let it be a third time. Be smart and pretend to be a fool and at the end of the hunt make sure you’re the one that has the gun.”

― Surgeo Bell

AP Passage to explore today:

AP 1-1rrn5ql

Read it and then do the questions by yourself. We’ll go over the answers in class today.

Here is the final for the Rhetorical essay:

Barak Obama Final-1mt3ks9

And the rubric for the final:

Barak Obama Final-1mt3kte

It’s due at the end of the class on Wednesday. Thursday, first thing, I’d like for you to be working on your own Rhetorical speech. (Not to be performed.) Please think throughout the week what your speech will be on.

February 8th, 2019

Journal Entry #8

“Sometimes when you’re young, you have moments of such happiness, you think you’re living on someplace magical, like Atlantis must have been. Then we grow up and our hearts break into two.”
― Stephen King, Hearts in Atlantis

Vocabulary quiz #1. AP focus next week.

Today is a peer edit.

Here is the actual rubric – I gave you all copies yesterday. Get up to three responses from others. You can use the one online.

Rubric rhetorical analysis-1npc6dd

You have the weekend to fine tune this essay as it is due on Monday. Monday will be your own essay, but it will be a take home based on Obama’s famous 2008 speech.

February 7th, 2019

Journal Entry #7

“Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.”

― Franz Kafka

Today, you will have the class to get those essays finished. I will collect them for completion grades, yet will attach a peer review for tomorrow. This is for your own use, as you will be using the structure to get your peers to edit the paper. I will collect the finalized edits and give you your final paper that you will do over the weekend and finalize on Monday (tentative).

Next week will be all about your own rhetorical speeches which I will give you a quick run-down for. Brainstorming on Monday.

February 6th, 2019

Journal Entry #6

“What are heavy? sea-sand and sorrow.
What are brief? today and tomorrow.
What are frail? spring blossoms and youth.
What are deep? the ocean and truth.”
― Christina Rossetti

We will work on body paragraphs today. Quick lecture on them – then I’ll have you finish it by tomorrow. Same sort of thing. You seem to be doing well so far, and I am glad to see your final essays on this rhetorical analysis.

February 5th, 2019

Journal Entry #5

“I have lived a great deal among grown-ups. I have seen them intimately, close at hand. And that hasn’t much improved my opinion of them.”

― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

Here’s notes for the lecture today. I hope you have your devices, because I’m going to show you how to, sentence by sentence, write a strong rhetorical essay.

How To Booklet Essay Outline Samples for each paragraph and tips-1i070a1

  1. Choose one of the three speeches we have worked on so far.
  2. copy and paste the sentence by sentence instructions.
  3. apply it to your own rendition of a rhetorical essay.

Tomorrow we will peer edit this, using the structure I provided today.

February 4th, 2019

Journal entry #4

“Whatever it is you’re seeking won’t come in the form you’re expecting.”
― Haruki Marukami

Hope you had a good weekend.

Vocabulary #1 is today. I’ll explain it today.

We will be continuing with the analysis of the speeches. I will walk around and help you a little bit with them as we go through the different stylistic devices.

Your job or takeaway today is to share your findings with the class on either the second or third speech in the package and turn in the worksheet (the first page).

I won’t be lecturing, but working with you individually on this assignment.

Tomorrow, I’ll teach you how to put it all together.

February 1st, 2019

“Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.”

― Rabindranath Tagore, Stray Birds

Today, we’ll be going over the MLK speech after you have time to write about it and watch the video. This video is remastered and edited from the 18 minute full version. You will get an idea of his orating style and we can talk about it.

You have 20-30 minutes to go over the speech and find how some of the rhetoric either works or doesn’t work. (Pathos, Logos, Ethos – literary devices from yesterday’s class.)

You will continue this on Monday as well.

January 31st, 2019

Journal Entry #2

“Youth is the best time to be rich, and the best time to be poor.”

-Euripides

Youth cannot know how age thinks and feels. But old men are guilty if they forget what it was to be young.

-J.K. Rowling

Let’s look at this longer lecture and then review:

4KtRUtUmVjsKgsh8-1533cnj

Now take a look at this stuff. We’ll be working on this for a few days – taking note of all the things you’ve learned.

(Handout Physical) If you’re absent – please find a person who you trust to give you the missing copies.

Speeches and Rhetoric

First, with rhetoric, there is more than just “Ethos Pathos & logos.” Authors use rhetorical devices to persuade their audiences as well.

  • Alliteration – the recurrence of initial consonant sounds – rubber baby buggy bumpers
  • Allusion – a reference to an event, literary work or person – I can’t do that because I am not Superman.
  • Amplification – repeats a word or expression for emphasis – Love, real love, takes time.
  • Analogy – compares two different things that have some similar characteristics – He is flaky as a snowstorm.
  • Anaphora – repeats a word or phrase in successive phrases – “If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh?” (Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare)
  • Antanagoge – places a criticism and compliment together to lessen the impact – The car is not pretty but it runs great.
  • Antimetabole – repeats words or phrases in reverse order – “ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.” (J F Kennedy)
  • Antiphrasis – uses a word with an opposite meaning – The Chihuahua was named Goliath.
  • Antithesis – makes a connection between two things – “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” (Neil Armstrong)
  • Appositive – places a noun or phrase next to another noun for descriptive purposes – Mary, queen of the land, hosted the ball.
  • Enumeratio – makes a point with details – Renovation included a spa, tennis court, pool and lounge.
  • Epanalepsis – repeats something from the beginning of a sentence at the end – My ears heard what you said but I couldn’t believe my ears.
  • Epithet – using an adjective or adjective phrase to describe – mesmerizing eyes
  • Epizeuxis – repeats one word for emphasis – The amusement park was fun, fun, fun.
  • Hyperbole – an exaggeration – I have done this a thousand times.
  • Litotes – makes an understatement by denying the opposite of a word that may have been used – The terms of the contract are not disagreeable to me.
  • Metanoia – corrects or qualifies a statement – You are the most beautiful woman in this town, nay the entire world.
  • Metaphor – compares two things by stating one is the other – The eyes are the windows of the soul.
  • Metonymy – a metaphor where something being compared is referred to by something closely associated with it – The knights are loyal to the crown.
  • Onomatopoeia – words that imitate the sound they describe – plunk, whiz, pop
  • Oxymoron – a two word paradox – near miss, seriously funny
  • Parallelism – uses words or phrases with a similar structure – I went to the store, parked the car and bought a pizza.
  • Simile – compares one object to another – He smokes like a chimney.
  • Understatement – makes an idea less important that it really is – The hurricane disrupted traffic.

Now fill out a questionnaire on speeches and we will read MLK I have a dream. We have the rest of class together to come up with the rhetorical devices and appeals. Tomorrow, you’ll be split into two groups to do two more speeches – time willing

Then we’ll be ready to write an essay.

January 30th, 2019

Youth ends when egotism does; maturity begins when one lives for others.

-Herman Hesse

Journal entries:

Quote Journal Grade 12-1h9pdy9

We can do the first exercise:

Shoes Appeal-2dn1eze

Present this to the class WITHOUT mentioning the appeal and we can guess and see if this is a good argument to buy the shoes.

There is also a handout that will be beneficial to you for when we go over speeches soon. Finish it at home before you get to class tomorrow because we will go over it before getting into groups for the next section of this class.

This is our unit on Rhetoric:

Introduction to EPL Purdy-26g84rb

Here’s a PPT that I’d like for you to take notes on:

Pathos_Logos_Ethos-28z9f35

Tomorrow we go further. One step at a time and you’ll nail this unit.

January 29th, 2019

Welcome.

Let’s Get started.

First, I would like you to write a paragraph about what it is you would like out of class following these questions: (This isn’t just for me – treat it as a rough draft for your grad transition shenanigans)

  1. What are my plans for post secondary? To what end will these plans meet?
  2. What are my strengths in English Literature? Be specific.
  3.  What are my weaknesses in English Literature? Be specific.
  4. What do you expect out of this class this semester? – This is an important question because each grade 12 class I’ve designed is tweaked for each dynamic.
  5. What is my expected grade? Why?

Then we’ll get to work:

Grade 12 2018 Introduction-zja3qg

This is our unit on Rhetoric:

Introduction to EPL Purdy-26g84rb

Here’s a PPT that I’d like for you to take notes on:

Pathos_Logos_Ethos-28z9f35

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