Math 10 Week #9- Removing the Greatest Common Factor

The is week in math we learned how to remove the greatest common factor. This helps factoring easier.

1. Factor all three numbers.

2. Take the common numbers and write it in front of the brackets.

3. Divide the three numbers by the common number and write it inside the brackets.

Example 1) In the first example you can see that 10, 25, and 30 can all be divided by 5 and X. So i wrote 5X infront of the brackets and then divide 10, 25, and 30 by 5, and you’ll eventually end up with 2, 5, and 6, which you write in the brackets, and also don’t forget to subtract the common X from each number.

Math 10 Week #8- Polynomials (area models)

This week we started our new unit on polynomials. You can solve a multiplication question of binomials using algebraic tiles, the distributive property, and an area model.

We reviewed how to use algebra tiles, and use the distributive property, but one new thing I learned how to do is to use an area model.

To calculate the area of a rectangle through an area model you must first, devide the boxes and multiply the two numbers into each rectangle. Second, group the like terms, and write them out starting from the biggest to the smallest.

 

 

 

 

Math 10 Week #7

This week of math we learned the basics of trigonometry. We learned how to calculate missing sides and angles through the acronym SOH CAH TOA. Trigonometry is new type of math that I’ve never dealt with. At first I thought the whole concept was confusing and hard, but as I practiced more, I’ve grown to really like solving trigonometry equations. ūüôā

1st equation: First, label all the sides of the triangle to make it easier to read, and base this of the reference angle. (Adjacent, Opposite, Hypotenuse) Second, take the side that is asked to find and the side with the given length. Which will help you choose which sign to use. Third, get the variable on the top of the fraction (in this case 12) to balance the equation, and then isolate the variable and multiply both numerators by the denominator of the fraction that contains the variable. Lastly, solve the equation.

2nd equation: First, label all the sides of the triangle to make it easier to read, and base this of the reference angle. (Adjacent, Opposite, Hypotenuse) Second, take the side that is asked to find and the side with the given length. Which will help you choose which sign to use. Third, to find the angle you would have to multiply the sign on both sides, but it changes into a negative when it moves to the other side of the equation (invert). Lastly, solve the equation.

3rd equation: First, label all the sides of the triangle to make it easier to read, and base this of the reference angle. (Adjacent, Opposite, Hypotenuse) Second, take the side that is asked to find and the side with the given length. Which will help you choose which sign to use. Third, eliminate 24 by multiplying it to both sides of the equation. Lastly, solve the equation.

Math 10 Week #5- Metric and Imperial System

This week in math 10 we learned about the Metric system and the Imperial system.

The Measurement¬†unit has a lot of rules and steps, and if you’re not causious it is easy to make little mistakes. I personally think that this unit is somewhat confusing, but it’s also fun to solve the equations, and learn about the relationships between all the units.

I was able to remember the metric system through the phrase “King Henry Doesn’t Usually Drinking Chocolate Milk”. Which actually stands for kilo, hecto, deca, unit(base), deci, centi, and milli. I also realized that a visual number line helps me a lot when converting units.

You would move the decimal (right/left) to the amount of spaces from your original unit to the one you want to convert it to.

 

The imperial system is mainly used in the US, but it is still important to know because we live very close. In the imperial system there are miles, yards, feet, and inches. An easy way to convert these units is to use a visual staircase.

You would multiply as you go down the staircase and divide when going up. Also remember that 1 inch=2.54cm, which is useful when converting units between the imperial and metric system.

Math 10 Week #4- Converting Rational Exponents into Radical

On the fourth week of math we mostly did review and prepared for our test on thursday. One thing I did learn was how to convert rational exponents into radical ones. This concept was new to me, and at first it was slightly confusing to me, but Flower Power helped me remember.

The flower would be the power and the root would be the root. The concept is very easy and simple. So when you convert it into a radical you would just have to remember that the numerator is the power and the denominator is the root.

Math 10 Week #3- Integral (Negative) Exponents

This week in math 10, our class learned exponent laws (multiplication, division, power). It was mostly review to refresh what we learned in grade 9 math, but I also learned how to convert negative exponents into positive exponents, which was new to me.

In order to solve a problem with a negative exponent, you would have to first locate the negative, and if it is located in the numerator bring it down to the denominator and vise versa. In other words, flip the negative reciprocal into a positive. ūüôā

Math 10 Week #2

This week in math 10, I learned how to convert entire radicals into mixed radicals and vise versa.

In order to simplify the entire radical, you would have to take a look at the radical’s factors. Among the factors find the perfect squares, and rewrite the radical using the pair of factors. Take the square root of the perfect square and pair the two identical numbers into one single number and place it outside of the radical.

This method can also be used for cube roots, fourth roots, and so on.

Taming of the Shrew Stop Motion Induction Scene Project

This stop motion video is based on “Taming of the Shrew” a comedic play written by William Shakespeare. This Stop motion was created by Joy, Keisha, Jenna. Joy’s role during the creation of the stop motion project was to download the stop motion app, take the photo’s, upload the video to YouTube, narrate scenes, and to bring in the Lego needed. Keisha also contributed by writing the storyboard, moving the characters, bringing in Lego, and narrating scenes. Jenna contributed by narrating scenes, and writing out the treatment plan. The induction scene in the play is used as the opening act and sets the tone or feeling for the main act, an inset is used to describe a play within in a play. We demonstrated the induction scene for the majority of our take on “Taming of the Shrew” by showing the story of Christopher Sly and the Lord’s prank. The inset can be seen near the end of our video when the players perform their play for Christopher Sly and his wife. For our project we used an app called “stop motion” to film our video, it was a simple app to use because you only needed to move your characters and take photo’s as well as a simple navigation system. We had decided to use Lego to present our version of “Taming of the Shrew” in a way different from a stage play. Some of the challenges that occurred during the making of the stop motion was getting the narration to match with the scenes, we had a hard time making sure we met the minimum of two minutes, and we had problems with getting the audio to work on the app. What we learned during the project was how to use the stop motion app,¬†and we also gained a better understanding of the induction scene from the play.

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