Author Archive for hannahc2019

Staying Safe at Work

1. 3 things I will do to stay safe at work are… 

I will ensure that I have proper safety information and training received from proper instructor, I would always ask if I have any question. It is also important to make sure that I am working in a safe environment, I would look around my surrounding to make sure there are nothing dangerous. Lastly, I would refuse unsafe work, I would not work a condition that I think is not safe.

2. 2 things I will do to keep others safe at work are… 

I will make sure my co-worker follow safety rules and instruction properly and look after them if they need help in order. I would need to work with other people in any workplace, keeping my co-workers safe also keep me safe.

3. Which story about a workplace accident stuck with you the most? Why? 

The workplace that stuck with me the most is the girl who lost three fingers. I think this is a common mistake many made, they may think this wouldn’t happen to them or they knew they wouldn’t do that. Yet sometimes people just didn’t think that much, such as the girl in this incident. She did not ask other to help when the dough got stuck and she did not turn off the machine before she put her hand in there. It is important to pay attention to your surrounding as even the smallest thing can be dangerous.

Indigenous Podcast – “Uncover”

This podcast “Uncover, is about a residential school survivor named Rev. Mary Battaja. Mary attended the Choutla Residential School in Carcross, Yukon. “Uncover” will reveal what happened in residential school, how Mary survived throughout the time and how residential school influenced her as a person and her life today. She tried to get rid and forget her past, traumas and continues living. While hearing Mary’s story, I feel deeply sorry for children who went to residential school. I hope more people would hear stories of residential school survivors and make sure the same mistake will never happen again. 

Works cited 

Campion-Smith, Bruce. “Survivors Remember Days in Residential Schools.” The Star, 2 June 2015, www.thestar.com/news/canada/2015/06/02/survivors-remember-days-in-residential-schools.htmlAccessed 5 November 2020.  

Thomson, Nancy. “Yukon Chief Knocks on Doors, Urges First Nations Citizens to Vote.” CBC News, 13 Oct. 2015, www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/chief-of-yukon-s-kwanlin-d%C3%BCn-first-nation-urges-citizens-to-vote-1.3267843. Accessed 5 November 2020. 

“Rev. Mary Battaja.” Legacy of Hope Foundation, 30 Oct. 2019, https://legacyofhope.ca/en/wherearethechildren/stories/battaja-2/. Accessed November 2020.  

Watts , David. “Anglican Indigenous Sacred Circle 2000 Walking a New Vision.” Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoplesarchive.anglican.ca/sc2000/news1.htm. Accessed 5 November 2020.

Advertising Target Markets

In 2013, Extra created a commercial called “Father & Daughter” to promote their spearmint flavor gums. Their target audience is all ages, as people eat gums no matter what their age is. The story is about a father that uses gum wrappers to make origami swans for his daughter whenever they eat gums. It turns out the daughter kept all the origami swans her dad made for her. It shows the bond between her and her father. Different advertising techniques are used in this commercial. One of the techniques that apply to this commercial is plain folks, the daughter and father are just like any ordinary family, they are neither celebrity or expert. Overall, the mood of the advertisement is sad, as it is designed to make the audience sob, which could be identified as emotional appeal. At the end of the commercial, repetition was used. The slogan, “Give Extra Get Extra” appeared, it is a catchphrase that Extra used every time in their commercial.

 

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