Human Condition

Human Condition

In the video, I Want To Be Seen, produced by Jon Jorgenson, features seven students whose minds are being explored. We witness their inner thoughts as they try to express to who they wish to be seen as. They want to be identified as one thing, without being mistaken for another, like how ones kindness can be mistaken for being naïve.  They do not express themselves out loud because they are afraid of what others may think. They want to find their proper identity, but being perceived in a negative way hinders them from being who they were made to be. In the end, they hear their own thoughts, which scares and hurts them. It’s as if their voices are pulling them in a thousand different directions and all they really want is to be seen and accepted.  And as their voices come to a halt and silence fills their ears they go back to how society has them portrayed. Humans all want to be accepted, loved and seen, but yet we judge others knowing that all they want is the same things that we want. This video shows that we want to have our own identity, but the fear of being judged keeps us from achieving who we are meant to be.

Week 17 in Math 10

System Equations

This week in math 10 we focused on systems of linear equations. We were taught 3 different ways of finding the possible solutions. We learned about graphing, substation ann or elimination. Using any of these 3 options will give you the same answers. The one I  found easiest was elimination.

When using elimination the biggest thing you want to do is create a zero pair with either the X or Y. Elimination can use either addition or subtraction, I will be using addition in my example because I find it easier and you’re less likely to mix up your positives and negatives.

Step 1: Rearrange equations if necessary. The zero pairs may not always be visible, if that’s the case you may need to multiply either one equation or both, so that either the X or Y makes a zero pair.

Step 2: Once you have your zero pair add both equations together. (I find it easier when you place one equation directly above the other.)

Step 3: Depending on what was you zero pair was your next step will be to isolate the variable that is left.

Step 4: Once you’ve figured out one of your missing variables place that variable in to one of your equations. (I suggestion picking the easier equation.)

Step 5: Once again you will need to isolate the variable. After doing that you should have you missing X and Y variables.

Step 6: It’s always good to verify. Once you’ve found both variables place those variable in your equation, if for both equations are true equations you have done it right. (The variable must work for both equations for it to be correct.)

Example 1: (Zero pair is already given)

-2x + 3y = 4

2x + 5y = 12

Example 2: (Zero pair must be found)

5x – 3y = -1

3x + 2y = 7

 

 

 

Week 15 in math 10

 

 

Slope point to y intercept form

This week in math 10 we learned about 3 different forms of equations. Today I will be changing point slope form into y-intercept form.

(1) General form: ex. 2x + 3y + 8 = 0

(2) y – intercept form: ex. y = 2x + 5

(3) Point slope form: ex. (9,3),  4  –> 4(x-9) = y – 3

Step 1 – Distribute the number that is in front of the brackets into all of the numbers inside the brackets.

Step 2 – You want to get y alone, and in order to isolate the y variable you need to flip the number beside the y to the other side of the equal sign. (Remember whenever bring any number to the other side you must change the sign.)

Step 3 – If there are 2 constants add or subtract them together.

 

 

Week 14 in math 10

Relation or Function

This week in math 10 we learned how to tell whether or not we are dealing with a function or a relation just by looking at a graph, mapping diagram or a table chart.

Graph: If there are closed dots that are found vertically in the same line or there are 2 horizontal lines that that are situated one directly on top of the other that both are not considered functions, because they share the same x value and a different y value.

Function: Because both the x values and y values are different. And there are no closed dots that are found in the same vertical line.

 

Relation: Because there are lines that are horizontal that pass one on top or the other. Which means that they share a vertical line.

Mapping: An easy way to tell if a mapping diagram is a function is if the lines are connected to one other number and if all the x values are different. You always want to look at you x values first and if all you x values are different it’s okay for them to share the same y value. If there are 2 or more of the same x value the only way for it to remain a function is if they all have the same y value.

Function: Because, all the x values are different and they are all connected to a different why value.

Right diagram: Function, because even though 3 and 4 share 8 as their y values it’s okay because they are different x values.

Left diagram: Relation, because 5 (the input number) has 2 different y values 2 and 9.

Table chart: An easy way to tell if a table chart is a function is if the x values and y values are different. It’s the same thing as the mapping diagram, you always want to look at you x values first and if all you x values are different it’s okay for them to share the same y value. If there are 2 or more of the same x value the only way for it to remain a function is if they all have the same y value.

Function: Because all the x values and y values are different.

Relation: Because if you look at the x values there are two 1s and both those 1s have different y values. (1,2) (1,5)